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ETEC 511

Foundations of Educational Technology (core)

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Final Grade: A+

Class Average: 88%

Extemporaneous Comments

Although most of the discussion forums in the MET courses were text-based, many of my contributions were made in video or audio format, as presented below in the audio player.  Please note that these comments are mainly unscripted. The references were added later, after reflecting on the comments.

This case-based course addresses the cultural-historical, ecological-natural, ethical-personal, existential-spiritual, sociopolitical and technical-empirical dimensions of technology with implications for curriculum and instructional design. How, why and to what degree have media and technology been incorporated into, or changed by, education and what foundations underlie these processes? The course is designed from a basis that educational media and learning technologies are not merely tools; educational premises are neither fully durable nor pliable; and actors or agents of education are not merely humans. It begins with an exploration of instructional design and case-based reasoning, proceeds through disciplinary and interdisciplinary foundations of e-learning, educational technology, learning technologies, and new media and concludes with the relatively neglected existential-spiritual dimension.

Source: ETEC511 Syllabus – 2014

  1. Technical-Empirical Dimension of Educational Technology
  2. Cultural-Historical Dimension of Educational Technology
  3. Ethical-Personal & Socio-Political Dimension of Educational Technology
  4. Ecological-Natural Dimension of Educational Technology
  5. Existential-Spiritual Dimension of Educational Technology

Source: ETEC511 Syllabus – 2014

Participation is valued at 20% of your final grade. We refer to the scholarly level of participation as academic conversation, which entails a variety of things including academic conversation, articulation and presentation. Participation is interdependent with preparation for each module, which involves reading (highlighting, pagination post-its, margin notes, comments & questions, etc.), writing (posting to discussions, note-taking, outlining, questioning, defining, mapping, framing, summarizing, journaling, blogging, podcasting, exposition, etc.), organizing (documenting, labeling, ordering, archiving, filing, sequencing events, chronicling, etc.), reflecting (rethinking, reincorporating, remapping, analyzing, synthesizing, etc.), and speaking (podcasting, corresponding with peers, chat, etc.). One goal of preparation is to sustain increasingly sophisticated academic conversations or engagement with the readings, course and peers. A second goal is to develop systematic approaches for engaging with the readings and your peers (i.e., developing reading, speaking, writing, organizing, and reflection form(at)s and styles that are effective). Read for Meaning along with Purpose…

Source: ETEC511 Syllabus – 2014

Discourse Leadership @ Case Study (40%)— Choose one week and topic on the schedule and in coordination with the module develop a case study for K-12 students. Format: Group Project— groups of 4. For the case that you develop:
1. Review and adhere to the guidelines for case studies in Module 2.
2. Develop a case that reflects the theme for the week/module chosen.
3. The case study must be designed for specific grade levels (e. g., 4-5, 6-8, 10-12).
4. Design necessary downloads @ handouts, discussion questions and presentation media
for clarifying the case study, e.g.:
• Image, Text, Sound files
• Timeline
• Wiki / Interactive Web / Prezi
• Voice & Podcast, etc.
5. To bring closure to the topic/module for the week, present your case study in either
synchronous or asynchronous time.
6. Please note that the workload for this ought to be equitable across all group members.
Consider a division of labour to complete the assignment.
7. Submit link to Case Study via the Assignments tool.

Source: ETEC511 Syllabus – 2014

Scholarly Essay (40%) — Choose a topic that corresponds with one of the weekly topics (i.e., foundations) or themes and write a scholarly paper exploring media and technology in education (i.e., apps, artifacts, devices, problems, processes, trends, etc.). The essay should provide a clear, cogent, concise exploration or case study of the topic (e.g., topics within or about e-learning, educational technology, learning technologies, ICT, new media, instructional design, curriculum design, etc.). Take a position (state a thesis or argument) and provide evidence, through examples and narrative, to support the position. Be creative and choose a topic that really interests you!

Source: ETEC511 Syllabus – 2014

Matiul Alam, Ph.D.

Matiul Alam, Ph.D. (Simon Fraser University) is an independent educational researcher teaches ETEC 521 Indigeneity, Technology and Education and ETEC 511 Foundations of Educational Technology in the MET Program. Dr. Alam, a former Professor of Education at Commonwealth Open University (UK) taught several other education courses including Oral Traditions and Literacy Development, Educating Exceptional Students, Dimensions of Equity, Achievement Motivation, Educational Psychology, Computer Uses in Education, Understanding Research, Classroom Management, Assessment and Evaluation in the Elementary, Intercultural Competencies for Teachers, Educational Research and data analysis, and School Community Relations in USA and Canada.

Dr. Alam was previously the President of the Vancouver Multicultural Society (2006-07) and a task force member of UNESCO’s anti-racism consultative forums. He has co-authored, “Combating Rural Poverty” and done several program evaluation reports as well as served on the editorial board of a social science journal, “Review of Human Factor Studies” and worked as a reviewer for the American Educational Research Association conference papers.

His interests include continuing and international education, informal and non-formal learning, instructional technology, multi-literacies and numeracy, professional ethics, and inclusive education of socially and economically disadvantaged students.

Source: http://met.ubc.ca/person/matiul-alam/

Tap or click to see references for some of the "Extemporaneous Comments"

References

Artifact #1

Online Presentation on Internet Memes

Artifact #1:

DLG @ Case Study Assignment

site imge

The Discourse Leadership Group (DLG) Case Study project was one of the most interesting I’ve undertaken so far in the MET program.  In fact, I found it so interesting that my Scholarly Essay assignment is closely related, drawing some of the same literature to support key aspects of my thesis (see Artifact #2 below).

As an online presentation this group project brought participants together from India, Korea, Eastern Canada and Western Canada. Discussing the different perspectives on internet memes was illuminating and, because everyone was so respectful of differences, really positive and pleasant. Through our discussions, we became increasingly aware of how the internet has had a profound effect on site imageculture and politics–and it has been accomplished mainly through that continuously evolving “unit of cultural transmission,” the internet meme.

Although some folks like to say that they “hate” memes, the fact remains that, as Richard Dawkins and other researchers suggest, the meme–and internet meme–will, for many years, play an important role in the continued evolution of the universe.

In the trio of videos below (Artifact #3), you can experience Dawkins explaining–in his own inimitable way–all about genes, memes, and internet memes….

Interactive Video on “What is a Meme?”

The following interactive video is powered by a company called EduCanon. It was one of my contributions to our DLG @ Case Study. Except for the fact that it is not responsive and therefore cannot automatically resize for the small screens of mobile devices, it is an effective tool for engaging students and allowing them to build their own knowledge through formative assessment. Your thoughts? Please share them in the comment section.

Click on the above image to participate in the interactive video.

Scholarly Essay: Pedagogy in the Age of Web 2.0

Course: ETEC 511 - Foundations of Educational Technology (core)

 

Reflection

This was a topic that turned out to be much bigger than I originally thought. The more research I did, the more I realized just how much power and scope I was grappling with. Unfortunately (or perhaps fortunately, depending on one’s point of view), there was a word limit of 3,000 words, so the essay barely scratches the surface, in my opinion. 

The word cloud, based on the essay, is linked to a pdf version of it:

Tap or click to view the course's scholarly essay requirements.

Scholarly Essay

Choose a topic that corresponds with one of the weekly topics (i.e., foundations) or themes and write a scholarly paper exploring media and technology in education (i.e., apps, artifacts, devices, problems, processes, trends, etc.). The essay should provide a clear, cogent, concise exploration or case study of the topic (e.g., topics within or about e-learning, educational technology, learning technologies, ICT, new media, instructional design, curriculum design, etc.). Take a position (state a thesis or argument) and provide evidence, through examples and narrative, to support the position. Be creative and choose a topic that really interests you!

 Source: ETEC511 Syllabus for 2013

Tap or click to read the paper via Google Drive's PDF viewer (for devices that don't have Adobe Reader installed)

Tap or click here to check out the references for the above artifact and reflection.

References

Technology and Spirituality

a discussion forum video post

My Final Discussion Forum Post

For my final contribution to the ETEC 511 (Foundations of Educational Technology) discussion forum on the spirituality of technology, it was crucial that I find a way to satisfy my own intrinsic need for deep reflection and clarity of thought in this very important and personal topic. To achieve this, I did some serious soul-searching about my past and present spiritual state of being, sought additional wisdom offered by some well respected thought leaders (like those shown in the videos below) and worked in the much more dynamic realm of multimedia instead of just printed text. Some of the questions that I attempt to answer include: “Can we have spirituality without technology? Can we have technology without spirituality? Is the ideal form of spirituality that without technology?”

 The video below is one that I produced, with a few relevant clips inserted and interwoven with my own thoughts.

Correction

My understanding of life and reality has evolved further since making the spirituality/technology video–and there are certain aspects of what I said that I now regard as inaccurate–especially in the segment where I discuss Feng and Petrina’s reference to secularism no longer seeming tenable . Now that I have taken time to revisit their manuscript and reflect more “SOULfully” , I realize that they were not actually declaring secularism as untenable. Rather, they were citing it as one example of many schools of thought in the realm of spirituality. Isn’t it wonderful how human thought is capable of evolving?

Three Transformational Thought Leaders

In the following trio of videos, three of the world’s most eminent scholars present their views on key aspects of life in this technologically super-charged 21st Century. Professor Richard Dawkins–with his focus on genes, memes, and internet memes–helps us to understand how human culture is evolving . Professor Michael Wesch provides an excellent anthropological perspective on YouTube and other Web 2.0 technologies , and Lawrence Lessig, a Harvard Law professor, shows how outdated copyright laws are in increasing need of revision . They are included here as a small symbolic sampling of the many new concepts that I began to grapple with in the MET Program. It was only by grappling with their ideas–and those of other MET students–that I was able to finally develop enough confidence to attempt producing such a personal and reflective video like the one above.

Just for Hits - Richard Dawkins
An anthropological introduction to YouTube.wmv
Laws that choke creativity | Larry Lessig

References 

Tap or click to check out the references for my reflective video on technology and spirituality.

References

Real Life Examples of Linking Theory to Practice:

The following blurbs will connect you to current examples of linking theory to practice.

More About Gary

additional information about Gary’s background & current practice

Reflections on HYU Practice

ongoing initiatives to support learners and faculty at Hanyang University

Overview of Current Sites

e-learning spaces that Gary currently uses in professional practice

Links to Old Spaces

discontinued spaces that trace Gary’s online footprint back to 2001

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